Our Stories

Going Back to School to Get Back to Work

Developing the right skills to compete in growing employment sectors is critical to families and to local economies. But what really works to build up long-term financial stability? LISC’s Chris Walker takes a look at the outcomes of research on workforce development programs—especially those that bundle education, training and placement with a broader array of financial counseling—and finds compelling evidence for how to help low-wage workers move past employment barriers and into new opportunities.

Using Pay for Success to Keep Families Together

Fourteen years ago a desperate plea for help turned into Safe Families for Children, an organization that provides families with volunteer hosts who can care for children on a short-term basis. Now, with support from LISC and it’s Pay for Success program, Safe Families will not only expand geographically, but will also increase how many families can find support.

Celebrating Latino Histories, Affirming Latino Futures

Ricardo Flores, director of LISC San Diego, kicks off our recognition of Hispanic Heritage Month with a blog about how working in partnership with Latino communities is key to the health of the country, and part of the fundamental relationship between local and national prosperity. "The conditions of the Latino population today provide us with a peek into the wellbeing of our society tomorrow and in the years to come," writes Flores.

To Go Full Steam Ahead, Transit-Oriented Development Must Be Inclusive

There’s burgeoning public support for mass transit all across the country. But to create livable neighborhoods along transit corridors that connect people with opportunity demands inclusive transit-oriented development. Our mandate, writes Maurice Jones, CEO of LISC, is to help ensure that everyone benefits from the prosperity coming down the line.

“We Are All Dreamers”

LISC CEO Maurice Jones weighs in on the critical role immigrants have always played in the social, economic and spiritual life of this country. The Dreamers, as 800,000 young people supported by the DACA program are known, are valuable assets to our schools, workplaces and neighborhoods, and we need their participation, just as they need a pathway to citizenship.